THE FIVE ELEMENTS TRAININGs

Complete training in sports, fitness or the martial arts is about FREEDOM. To be fully human, the wholeness of being FREE- of diseases, FREE- of mental and emotional turmoils, FREE – to be and express our individuality and creative self in life or in defending ourselves.

My basis for training is oriented towards balance for the human mind and body. Body, mind (spirit) and emotions(soul) all work together, affecting and effecting each other.

All Training should increase and support this wholeness. We can not train the body without affecting the mind and feelings.

When I trained like a bodybuilder, the admiration and praises kept me motivated and pushing my limits. Luckily being a martial artists first it was not enough for me to be admired and to show off and the weight didnt work so well by being an acrobat either….

Initially my aim was to increase strength for martial arts, that was way I turned to training with weights.

INTRODUCTION TO 5 ELEMENTS TRAINING CONCEPT

The book of five rings: GO RIN NO SHO – is the classical work of Miyamoto

Musashi’s journey as a Ronnin (Renegade samurai) and becoming the greatest swordsman in Japan. In the book of five rings, he traces the roots of his training since he was a young boy.

He trained, searching for the truth in the way of swordmanship. (Kenjutsu)

The Book of Earth chapter serves as an introduction, and metaphorically discusses martial arts, leadership, and training as building a house.The Book of Water chapter describes Musashi’s style, Ni-ten ichi-ryu, or “Two Heavens, One Style”. It describes some basic technique and fundamental principles.The Book of Fire chapter refers to the heat of battle, and discusses matters such as different types of timing.The Book of Wind chapter is something of a pun, since the Japanese character can mean both “wind” and “style” (e.g., of martial arts). It discusses what Musashi considers to be the failings of various contemporary schools of sword fighting.The Book of the Void chapter is a short epilogue, describing, in more esoteric terms, Musashi’s probably Zen-influenced thoughts on consciousness and the correct mindset.

You can read the whole book on the wiki article. (GERMAN)

Excellence Training is made up of the five stages of training and “mastery” – mastery is a very ambiguous term here… its not a destination, it is an on going process of simplicity…

EARTH – Grounding –  this gives your body the firm foundations by working on the deep muscles of the body the bads and ligaments. Ground excercises buids strength and endurance. Deep roots support the sturdiest tree.

WATER – Flowing – The water elements keeps you supple and flowing. This excercises builds your flexibility, dexterity and coordination. Fluid, fluent transition.

AIR – Soaring – Daynamic and soaring. This element exercises will prepare you for jumping higher and easier. They increase agility and confidence in movement. Very good for people who want to learn somersaults or backflips.

FIRE -Desire –  Powerful, Raging, desire and passion. Learn to “focus your rage”into productivity so as to purify your purposes and intents. Spirited action is far much noticeable and effective than just doing something emty of meaning and feeling. ” Its not what you do, its HOW you do what you do!”

VOID – SPACE – THE TAO- Creation

All that we are is space, energy and matter. It is In all matter, through all substances and the begining of all. Unfathomable. Space has allways been. The training here reaches apoint of spontenity, instictive and other than conscious competence in the way you excercise or live your life. You live and move in harmony at one with creation and who you are. At peace with yourself and others. Your body intelligence is free to act without interferance…( watch a painter at workwho has mastered his art, or a musician or a real martial arts master) it is absolutely indescribable what he/she does.

“A master in the art of living draws no sharp distinction between his work and his play; his labour and his leisure; his mind and his body; his education and his recreation.

He hardly knows which is which. He simply pursues his vision of excellence through whatever he is doing, and leaves  others to determine whether he is working or playing. To himself,  he always appears to be doing both.”